Monday, December 8, 2014

The Disillusioned - book review


Within the first 10 pages of The Disillusioned, a mother of two grown sons commits suicide, leaving behind a will that sends her sons looking for answers. This book is then a hard-to-put-down mystery as they leave their comfortable lives in the US to travel to Zambezi in search of a woman they know nothing about. Along the way, they come face to face with the slave trade in Africa, which results in the disappearance of thousands of children.

In fact, this book was written to bring awareness to this issue. One press release for the books states: Penned by California’s D.J. Williams, ‘The Disillusioned’ is directly tackling the $30-billion human trafficking industry by putting a much needed spotlight on the underground trade. With a bold and hard-hitting narrative, the book has resonated with readers around the world. . . .proceeds from each copy of ‘The Disillusioned’ are going directly into the hands of those working tirelessly to fight slavery.

Because I had read the press release, I expected the book to center on the slave trade, however the main focus of the story is on the mom's suicide and the sons' search to uncover a mystery involving their father, a mega-church pastor who was killed a year earlier. I enjoyed the story, however I really wanted some answers sooner than they came (isn't that often the way it is with mysteries?).

[WARNING: spoiler ahead!] Despite the fact that the storyline includes a pastor involved in infidelity (which does not represent the majority of pastors, but still reflects poorly on Christians and pastors as a whole), I would definitely recommend this book to those who enjoy a good mystery and those who want to learn more about the slave trade in Africa.

(The author provided me a free pdf copy of this book [which I read on my Kindle] in exchange for an honest review. Thanks DJ!)
www.djwilliamsbooks.com

2 comments:

Barbara Eads said...

I've downloaded the sample of this book. It sounds like something I would enjoy.

Missus Wookie said...

Human trafficking, where ever it happens, is something that concerns me (I've just signed up for a conference in April about that) so I'm tempted - I'll have a look at the book too.